Another Perspective on Copiers vs. Printers and Lexmark vs. HP


Whether you call them copiers, printers or MFPs, the convergence of copy/print/fax/scan has created a blur in our use of the terms. Today, most people use “copier” when they are really talking about a multi-function printing device (MFP) that does copy, but also prints, faxes and scans.

OEMs who started out in the traditional copier market, such as Xerox, Ricoh, and others, and the companies that sell and service those brands, refer to them as copiers. They are the “office machines” businesses who have traditionally sold to office managers, purchasers, etc.

OEMs who started out in the laser printer business, such as HP and Lexmark, and the companies that sell and service those brands refer to them as printers or MFPs. They are the “printer” companies who have traditionally sold to IT departments.

Those lines are now blurred. Copiers print and printers copy. For the sake of clarity in this post, we’ll refer to them all as “copiers”.

We are fortunate to have two very talented service guys on this blog, Kevin Gumpp and Brian Ude.  They each have a unique perspective on the HP vs. Lexmark market in the world of MFPs. Read the ‘HP Guy’s’ perspective here.  Then check out the ‘Lexmark Guy’s’ Perspective below.

======================

Let’s examine another reason HP might not be predominate in the copier market

And why, in this service guys opinion, they should lose some of the market share they have in the printer market.

It’s simple, HP’s service and support, beyond the major metropolitan areas, is virtually non-existent. Yes, almost anybody can get parts and supplies but not from HP and definitely not for warranty and service packs. Continue Reading

Is it a Printer that Copies or a Copier that Prints? How the Convergence of Copy/Print/Fax/Scan has Blurred the Lines.


Whether you call them copiers, printers or MFPs, the convergence of copy/print/fax/scan has created a blur in our use of the terms. Today, most people use “copier” when they are really talking about a multi-function printing device (MFP) that does copy, but also prints, faxes and scans.

OEMs who started out in the traditional copier market, such as Xerox, Ricoh, and others, and the companies that sell and service those brands, refer to them as copiers. They are the “office machines” businesses who have traditionally sold to office managers, purchasers, etc.

OEMs who started out in the laser printer business, such as HP and Lexmark, and the companies that sell and service those brands refer to them as printers or MFPs. They are the “printer” companies who have traditionally sold to IT departments.

Those lines are now blurred. Copiers print and printers copy. For the sake of clarity in this post, we’ll refer to them all as “copiers”.  

We are fortunate to have two very talented service guys on this blog, Kevin Gumpp and Brian Ude. They each have a unique perspective on the HP vs. Lexmark market in the world of MFPs. Read the ‘HP Guy’s’ perspective below.  Then check out the ‘Lexmark Guy’s’ Perspective here.

Why don’t we see many HP MFPs in the market place? 

While HP probably makes one of the strongest, most durable machines available, you don’t see very many companies using them as their main copier.  I believe the majority of companies are using Ricoh, Toshiba, Sharp, Konica, or Xerox brands as their main copier.

I wondered why, since I often hear customers say, “I never have my HP printer serviced but I have my copier serviced all the time.”

So let’s explore that question – why haven’t  HP and Lexmark become more dominant in the traditional copier market like they have in the printer market?  I’ll share some of my opinions on the benefits of an HP machine as well as some of the other brands. Continue Reading