Groaning-type Noise: HP M551, M575, CP4000, and CM4000 Series


I’ve received several calls in the last few months where these machines are experiencing groaning noises. This problem tends to happen only during color prints, during large print jobs, and right after the machine has printed its last page and is preparing to sit idle.

On three of these service calls recently, the problem I found has been with the cartridges. In every case, several of the color toners have been empty and needing to be replaced. Once the empty toners had been replaced the groaning noise went away.  So, if you find yourself or your customers with this issue, check the toner levels and replace the ones that are near empty or empty.

It’s been my experience that people tend not to use the color toners in these machines very often so the cartridges tend to be in the machine for a longer period of time and, unlike most machines, these printers will run even when a toner cartridge is completely out.

On one machine that I worked on the OEM yellow cartridge was completely empty and no yellow toner was on the developer mag. roller or on the demo page but the machine continued to print even though in the usage page the machine said it had no life left.

I’m not saying replacing these empty/near empty toner cartridges will definitely fix all the groaning-type noises but it is something to consider when you get called out to service one of these model printers with this particular print engine.

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Kevin Gumpp is a certified printer technician and freelance writer for Market Point. If you have a question regarding this topic or have any other printer repair related questions or topics for which you would like more information, please send an email to maryp@marketpoint.com.

Sticky Situation: Pads on solenoids and paper path sensor flags are causing paper jams!”


Today’s Guest Post is from Cliff Bishop at KIS Computer Center in La Puente, California.

Cliff writes:  My HP service career started in 1989 with the original LaserJet and [my] certifications include almost every LaserJet made since.

Below is something I have found helpful:

Equipment:  LaserJet II to current machines

HP and other printer makers use solenoids to control paper flow.  To reduce “clicking” they put foam pads on one or both sides of the moving armature of the solenoids.  Over time the pad wears and the adhesive migrates through the pad making the armature of the solenoids stick.  Even a momentary “stick” can cause extra pages to feed or the D-Roller to grab and stop a page.

HP would have us at least replace the solenoid, and in the case of many Optional Tray 3+ products, replace the entire assembly.

Official Solution:  Replace the solenoid.

What I do:
1) remove the solenoid
2) Place clear plastic tape on each side of the sticking surfaces
3) reassemble and test the device

Related situation:
Some paper path flags also use foam pads to keep them quiet and have the same issue with the same solution.

Broken Paper Trays and Feed Issues in HP P3005 and P3015 printers


In the last few weeks I’ve had to replace four trays for machines that had broken paper stops. I believe a lot of these problems stem from customer misuse/abuse.

In general, I go out on these calls because the machine has been having issues for quite some time and finally the paper stop breaks in the rear of the machine causing the machine to stop printing completely.

Situation

As the pickup roller in the tray wears down the machine struggles to feed paper out of the paper tray. Customers tend to fill the tray full with paper, which helps in the short-term for feed issues but doesn’t fix the underlining issue. Over time, even a full drawer of paper doesn’t alleviate the problem. Plus, after overloading the paper tray and slamming it in and out repeatedly the stop at the back of the tray breaks leaving the tray useless.

Solution

Let your customer know — instead of struggling with feed issues for months, getting frustrated and taking their anger out on the feed tray, a visit from their service tech to diagnose the problem and repairing/replacing the worn parts on the machine will prevent additional damage and repair costs. Purchasing a new feed tray can double a repair bill; roller and sep pad replacement is easy and inexpensive.

And, with a little technical savvy, the users may be up to the task of replacing the roller/sep pad themselves.

If you’re a user and find that your printer is having feed issues, order the parts listed below and follow the easy to understand instructions found in the service manual at Market Point’s website to avoid unwanted repair cost.

View the service manual for the HP P3005 printer here.
View the service manual for the HP P3015 printer
here.

Cassette Tray, P3005, part # RM1-3732
Pick up roller, P3005, part # RL1-1370
Sep Pad, P3005, part# RM1-6303
Cassette Tray, P3015, part # RM1-6279
Pick up roller, P3015, part # RM1-6313
Sep Pad, P3015, part # RM1-6303

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Kevin Gumpp is a certified printer technician and freelance writer for Market Point. If you have a question regarding this topic or have any other printer repair related questions or topics for which you would like more information, please send an email to maryp@marketpoint.com.