HP LaserJet 5200, M5025, and M5035 Series Grinding Noise


I’ve heard a few noisy M5025‘s and M5035‘s. Given the fact that everyone of these machines that I’ve worked on had the similar noise, I didn’t think too much of it. A few weeks ago I was called out to work on a 5200 series printer that gets very heavy usage. In the past two years the customer had put just over 400,000 prints on it. The printer was now jamming in the rear of the machine and making a grinding noise.

When I arrived onsite I noticed that the exit rollers on top of the machine were moving, but were periodically skipping. I then knew I had a gear problem somewhere in the machine. I had just installed a new fusing assembly in this same machine four  months ago. Therefore, my first thought was that something went wrong with that fusing assembly. Below are the steps I followed for troubleshooting this problem.

Troubleshooting Tips for Grinding Noise

Note : I’m not going to put the parts removal instructions in this article; you can find that information in the service manual located here.

Warning: When re-assembling the Fuser Drive Gear Assembly there is a shutter in front of the fusing assembly located  inside the machine. Failure to get the post in its proper location on the drive assembly will result in smeared prints. Trust me, I know J. Double check to make sure everything is in its proper spot before assembly. Also, the manual doesn’t show how the gears are positioned on the Fuser Drive Gear Assembly. Before removing the gears take a picture or make sure to lay them out so you can remember.

Let’s proceed

1. Open the back door exit assembly and attempt to feed paper out the back of the machine, bypassing the exit assembly.

2. Remove fusing assembly and check the gears.

3. Use a flashlight and check the gears on the fuser drive assembly and try to rotate them if needed. Also, check for gear dust build up in the area of the fusing assembly gears and the fuser drive gear assembly.

4. Remove the Fuser Drive Gear Assembly and check the gears.

In the case of the machine I was working on, the main dual drive gear had stripped out on the smaller section. After doing a little research I found, like most HP machines, the service manuals for these machines don’t have very specific details of what needs to be ordered. I did find that most parts vendors are selling after market gear kits that come with several gears in the fuser drive gear assembly. I ordered the parts and went out the next day and replaced them. The machine is back in business and working again.

Like any large volume HP machine built in the last decade, due to the extreme pressure and fast speeds, the fuser drive gears will wear out, make noise, and eventually lead to extreme noise and jamming. In the case of the machine I just serviced, there wasn’t much warning. I think a lot of that had to do with the heavy usage. I will be adding this gear kit (RM1-2963) to stock along with the other HP gear kits. I recommend keeping one or two on hand to avoid down time and return visits.

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Kevin Gumpp is a certified printer technician and freelance writer for Market Point. Market Point is a HP PartsOne Partner selling HP printer parts. If you have a question regarding this topic or have any other printer repair related questions or topics for which you would like more information, please send an email to maryp@marketpoint.com.

One thought on “HP LaserJet 5200, M5025, and M5035 Series Grinding Noise

  1. See tech tip below.

    On December 16, 2013 at 2:50 PM Market Point’s Tech Support Blog wrote:

    > Market Point posted: “I’ve heard a few noisy M5025’s and M5035’s. Given the > fact that everyone of these machines that I’ve worked on had the similar > noise, I didn’t think too much of it. A few weeks ago I was called out to work > on a 5200 series printer that gets very heavy usa” >

    Like

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