Troubleshooting Jamming and Paper Feed Issues on a Lexmark X264dn


The other day I went on a call for a Lexmark X264 that was getting multiple paper jam errors. The errors were not consistent; the printer worked fine at times but also had days where it was not working correctly.  When I arrived onsite, I printed a few pages and everything looked OK. So, I started looking further.

I removed the paper tray and checked the feed rollers. Then I tried printing again and got some paper jam problems. I removed the tray, again, for further inspection and found the source of the problem—the paper stop in the back of the tray was broken and had slid back so the paper wasn’t sitting up in the tray like it should. I installed in a new paper tray (part number 40X5381) and a few paper feed tires (part number 40X5440) and the machine was back and working the way it should.

Other possible causes of feed related issues are the registration rollers. If you remove the toner cartridge you will see a green and gray plastic piece that covers these rollers. Remove the four screws, pull the cover off and clean the rollers. These rollers get a build up on them and can cause odd feed issues. The media feed clutch that sits on the ACM unit is another part of the machine that I’ve seen cause some intermittent feed problems. This isn’t the easiest to get to but something worth checking out or replacing if you’re not seeing anything else that is the obvious. source of a paper feed problem.

===
Kevin Gumpp is a certified printer technician and freelance writer for TKO Electronics/Market Point. TKO Electronics/Market Point is a  Lexmark Elite Authorized Parts Distributor selling Lexmark printer parts and a HP PartsOne Partner selling  HP printer parts. If you have a question regarding this topic or have any other printer repair related questions or topics for which you would like more information, please send an email to maryp@marketpoint.com.

HP LaserJet P3015 Intermittent Jamming or Black Marks on the Back


This topic was covered briefly in a previous post. At that time I didn’t have a defined solution, but since then I’ve gotten feedback from others and I’ve personally fixed a few machines with this problem so today we’re going to get to the solution.

I’ve seen slow printing from the first 500 sheet tray in these HP P3015 printers. By that, I mean, occasionally the paper feeds up into the two feed rollers behind the MP tray and stalls out. This causes the pickup roller to rotate again, pushing the paper up into the registration assembly. In most cases, this doesn’t cause a paper jam; however, if you’re printing a 50 page document you will notice a slight hesitation with every few pages so the output is not at a consistent pace. Also, because the paper is slipping on the two feed rollers, you see two black lines in the middle of the back side of the page about 2 or 3 inches down.

Last week I worked on a printer that was actually having some paper jam issues as a result of this. The machine had 320,000 prints on it and had been operating for a few years with the hesitation and marks on the page without any serious problems related to it. However, with the paper jam errors starting to happen I decided it was time to address this problem. Continue reading

What To Do When Paper is Jamming in the Left side of an HP 9040 or 9050 Printer


I get lots of calls on the HP 9040 and 9050 models for random paper jams in the machine. Often times the customer informs me that the problems tend to happen first thing in the morning. After about a half hour fighting with the machine it starts working again, but with  random paper jams every so often.  The customer also notes that many times, when they get a paper jam, there are several sheets of paper stuck all over the machine so they have a hard time telling where the jam actually occurred.

The HP 9040 and 9050 machines are very sensitive in their timing. If the paper gets to certain parts of the machine a hair late it can result in a jam error (I’ve often wondered why HP made these machines so time sensitive). Anyway, I’ve seen surprisingly few problems with the paper pick up assembly other than broken paper sensor actuators. The feed rollers in these machines are well designed with plenty of rubber so they hardly ever cause feed issues.

Most of the paper jam problems are in the fusing unit.

The fuser pressure roller develops flat spots, which causes toner to build up on the hot roller and leads to paper sticking to and jamming Continue reading

Lexmark Autocompensator 101


It’s fairly simple in design (see diagram at the end of this post). A motor turns some gears that in turn rotate the shaft the rollers are attached to. In theory the design’s use of force makes the media in the tray inconsequential. No matter what media is being used, from tissue paper to card stock labels, the Autocompensator will deliver it to the imaging part of the printer one page at a time. Also, in theory, the Autocompensator cannot fail. In theory.

From the Lexmark Optra S to the Lexmark T630s the Autocompensator had a spring operated clutch on the roller shaft that only allowed the shaft to turn in one direction. That made it real easy to troubleshoot. The spring clutch, gears, motor, etc. rarely fail. However, the rollers get slick and then can’t move the media from the tray to imaging. Thus, you’d get a paper jam error but no jammed paper could be found. Simple fix: replace the rollers and all is well with the world.

One common problem to avoid is installing the rollers on the wrong side. They’re directional. Look at the sides of the rollers to observe the direction of the arrows. Always make sure they are pointing toward the front of the printer. Continue Reading

Troubleshooting Problems in the HP LaserJet 8100 and 8150


I know The HP LaserJet 8100 and 8150 printers are older models and it may seem like they are past their prime, but I still have several out in the field and recently I’ve seen a resurgence in service calls for these models. In this post I’ll share some of the more common problems with these printers in an attempt to help you diagnose and repair them as needed.

50.1 Fuser Error in the HP 8100 and 8150
You’re probably thinking “how hard can the 50.1 fuser error be to fix?” In this model, like the old HP LaserJet II and III series, the error is usually related to the AC power supply, not the fuser. Actually, about 90% percent of the time it’s the AC power module. When servicing machines for this error I typically pull the fuser out and check the thermal fuse on top of the fuser and the lamps inside the unit for continuity to verify the problem isn’t in the fuser. I also check that when the machine turns on it doesn’t initialize and then say “warming up” on the display.  If it just jumps to 50.1 error, that is another give away.

After verifying the problem is related to the AC power supply I check the fuser for common wear and tear in case the fuser also needs to be replaced. When checking the fuser: Continue Reading

For Print Quality Issues Toner Cartridge is Suspect Number One


For any print quality issue the first check should be the toner cartridge, especially if the cartridge is compatible or refurbished in a Lexmark printer. Any cartridge other than a brand name Lexmark OEM or Lexmark re-manufactured cartridge is suspect number one, even for some jamming problems.

Be on the look out
When you open the bag the cartridge is shipped in, watch for excess toner in the bottom of the bag and on the cartridge. If you find loose toner in either of these places put the cartridge back in the bag and locate another because, if you use it in that condition it’s going to leak toner inside your printer. The toner will pile up on the inside causing smudges and streaks, pages folded at one or both leading corners, and eventually jamming at the entrance to the fuser. Not to mention the print quality issues you’ll experience.

Here’s what happens
Under the cartridge, the toner will coat the Transfer Roller and show up as grey on the back of prints, and/or inefficient image transfer to the paper from the image drum in the cartridge.

Continue Reading

End User Tips on Fixing Common Problems


Every printer is bound to have problems arise over its life time. Some problems will be easy enough to fix that your customer can handle it. Other problems, of course, require the skills of a professional service technician. In this article I will touch on some of the easy fixes that customers can mostly likely handle on their own.

Tip for Service Companies
There are many reasons why some of the easy problems most customers can handle on their own can effect a service company’s reputation. While it’s fun for us techs to go out to a customer’s office and tell them they just have a defective toner or clean white-out off a glass strip and charge a fee, our goal is to make our customers happy. One key to doing that is to make sure they don’t see us all the time to fix minor issues. If your customer’s Accounting Department sees constant billings from a service provider they start to wonder if they are doing a good job. It might not be the techs fault, but the customer paying the bills might not see it that way. While educating your customers with a few tips might, at first, seem like a bad idea from a financial point of view; it can go a long way toward promoting a trusting, honest relationship with your customers for a lasting relationship and a good reputation.

Of course not all customers care about fixing their own printers. Some just want the printer fixed and done whenever there is any kind of problem so, when attempting to give tips and advice, pay attention to your customer. If they seem uninterested, cut the conversation short and move on. Not everybody cares for free advice.

Fixing Common Problems

Continue Reading