Troubleshooting Problems in the HP LaserJet 8100 and 8150


I know The HP LaserJet 8100 and 8150 printers are older models and it may seem like they are past their prime, but I still have several out in the field and recently I’ve seen a resurgence in service calls for these models. In this post I’ll share some of the more common problems with these printers in an attempt to help you diagnose and repair them as needed.

50.1 Fuser Error in the HP 8100 and 8150
You’re probably thinking “how hard can the 50.1 fuser error be to fix?” In this model, like the old HP LaserJet II and III series, the error is usually related to the AC power supply, not the fuser. Actually, about 90% percent of the time it’s the AC power module. When servicing machines for this error I typically pull the fuser out and check the thermal fuse on top of the fuser and the lamps inside the unit for continuity to verify the problem isn’t in the fuser. I also check that when the machine turns on it doesn’t initialize and then say “warming up” on the display.  If it just jumps to 50.1 error, that is another give away.

After verifying the problem is related to the AC power supply I check the fuser for common wear and tear in case the fuser also needs to be replaced. When checking the fuser: Continue Reading

Troubleshooting Lexmark 4069 Fusers – Part 1


In my previous post I wrote about Lexmark T-Series fusers in general. Now I’ll get more specific. In this post I’ll try to provide some, hopefully interesting, observances about individual model idiosyncrasies, challenges and opportunities.

Remember, I’m not trying to tell anybody how to troubleshoot. Nor am I claiming that all the information contained here is gospel. This is just some stuff I’ve noticed, experienced and talked with other techs about over the years. It’s information that’s worked for me. I hope it works for you.

At the outset I’d like to say that Lexmark fusers are ‘complicated simplicity’. I said in the last post that Lexmark hasn’t changed much of the basic design since the Optra S. That’s the ‘simplicity’. The ‘complicated’ enters the picture with the number of little variations within each model according the Type Number.

Let’s begin our fuser journey with the Lexmark T61x.  Continue Reading

End User Tips on Fixing Common Problems


Every printer is bound to have problems arise over its life time. Some problems will be easy enough to fix that your customer can handle it. Other problems, of course, require the skills of a professional service technician. In this article I will touch on some of the easy fixes that customers can mostly likely handle on their own.

Tip for Service Companies
There are many reasons why some of the easy problems most customers can handle on their own can effect a service company’s reputation. While it’s fun for us techs to go out to a customer’s office and tell them they just have a defective toner or clean white-out off a glass strip and charge a fee, our goal is to make our customers happy. One key to doing that is to make sure they don’t see us all the time to fix minor issues. If your customer’s Accounting Department sees constant billings from a service provider they start to wonder if they are doing a good job. It might not be the techs fault, but the customer paying the bills might not see it that way. While educating your customers with a few tips might, at first, seem like a bad idea from a financial point of view; it can go a long way toward promoting a trusting, honest relationship with your customers for a lasting relationship and a good reputation.

Of course not all customers care about fixing their own printers. Some just want the printer fixed and done whenever there is any kind of problem so, when attempting to give tips and advice, pay attention to your customer. If they seem uninterested, cut the conversation short and move on. Not everybody cares for free advice.

Fixing Common Problems

Continue Reading

Tips and Tricks for Troubleshooting and Installing Lexmark T Series Fusers


Information is the Key

It’s important to be familiar with each model of Lexmark printer that you maintain or repair. Study and compare the fuser drawings and you’ll find many of the design elements are the same. However, differences in print speed require different lamps, backup (pressure) roller sizes, heat roller construction, thermal fuses, and thermisters. And although the lamp contact assemblies are basically the same, their installation can vary widely. Notice also that some fuser elements vary within a given model according to the Printer Type Number (last 3 digits after the engine number found inside the front cover). These differences are important for image quality, and therefore, customer satisfaction. If there’s enough design deviation the result will be a 920 series Service Error Code. If not, the result will be service calls to adjust paper and fuser settings, dissatisfied customers and a shortened fuser life.

Lexmark Service Bulletins are an excellent source of information. For example, Bulletin #T65x 114 has good information on accordion type jams inside the fuser. I’ve included the section “Changing the type of fuser unit installed (T65x and X65x Series printers only) below. If you’re an Authorized Service Provider (ASP) Lexmark will email service bulletins to you directly. If you’re not an ASP they are available, on a limited basis, at the “Support/Download” part of Lexmark’s website. Also, check this blog and others like it, these experts should have this stuff memorized.

The following paragraphs are intended for your information.

They contain little things I’ve learned over the years on the job and from other techs. There is no intention, implied or otherwise, to try to tell anyone how to troubleshoot or repair any printer. I think there is some good information that worked for me at one time or another and hopefully it’ll work for you.  Continue Reading